Stephan Chalon

VP, Experimental Medicine & Clinical Pharmacology
Research & Development

What I do at MMV:

As Head of Experimental Medicine & Clinical Pharmacology, I’m the physician responsible for early drug development and experimental medicine studies. I work together with colleagues from Discovery, Translational Medicine and Product Development to identify and progress the best candidates for clinical investigations. I am responsible for First-In-Man studies, early demonstration of parasitic activity in humans (Proof-of-Concept studies) and various clinical pharmacology studies supporting New Drug Applications with MMV new chemical entities.

Why I work at MMV:

Primarily to accelerate development of new medicines against a life-threatening parasitic disease. It’s exciting to work with highly motivated and enthusiastic MMV colleagues and external experts across continents. This work environment keeps you focused on fighting against resistant malaria!

More about me:

My drug development expertise covers multiple therapeutic areas (neuroscience, cardio-metabolism, immuno-inflammation/internal medicine) from candidate selection up to Proof-of-Concept/PhaseIIA studies and Clinical Pharmacology packages supporting submission. I joined MMV in May 2014, after a 20-year career in the field of early development, translational medicine and clinical pharmacology. This includes 14 years in large pharmaceutical companies where I held positions in Europe and in the US with Lilly Research Laboratories, Wyeth/Pfizer Global R&D, Roche Pharma and Shire Pharmaceuticals.

I completed my medical training at Paris VI University in France and am a board-certified internist. I also have a PhD in Pharmacology from Paris XI University and did my postdoctoral fellowship in Clinical Pharmacology at Stanford University, USA.

Ask me about:

Evaluating “drugability” of new chemical entities, reviewing R&D projects from a clinical perspective, translating animal findings into human data, focusing on risk/benefit and proof of pharmacology/efficacy in human subjects... Cooking a French “Tarte-Tatin”, preparing for a triathlon and listening to jazz!