Video interview with malaria experts:

Do you think we will ever be able to eradicate malaria?

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Why invest in malaria?

mother and child

A burden at all levels

In malaria-endemic regions, all layers of society are affected. For countries it slows economic growth by 1.3% per year, translating to lost annual GDP across sub-Saharan Africa of US$12 billion. For communities malaria is why children miss school or why crops are not harvested. For families malaria means the death and disability of young children, and increased risks in pregnancy for both mother and baby. The sad truth is that many African communities simply accept malaria as part of everyday life, trapped in a vicious cycle in which malaria is both the cause and consequence of grinding poverty.

African children hardest hit

The malaria statistics are stark: More than 1 million deaths every year. A child dies every 40 seconds. Globally, 85% of all malaria deaths are in pre-school children. Over 40% of African national health budgets are soaked up by the disease. Africa, where the climate, mosquito vector, malaria parasite and poverty all combine, continues to bear the brunt with more than 90% of all cases worldwide.

A preventable disease

Malaria is preventable using the tools we already have: insecticides, mosquito nets, preventative drugs and effective treatments.  Malaria has already been eradicated from many regions of the globe, including parts of Europe and North America. Control and eventual eradication will be difficult in the remaining areas, but the situation is far from hopeless.

A global will

There is now real international will to bear down on malaria, reduce the burden so that no-one dies for want of health interventions, and ultimately wipe the disease from the face of the earth. The past decade has seen unprecedented international cooperation to defeat malaria. With effective tools at hand, the resources are at last being made available to deliver on the promises. Effective, safe and high-quality antimalarial drugs of the kind developed by MMV are at the forefront of this re-energized approach.